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Frequently Asked Questions About the Assessment Process

How often do banks and federal savings associations pay the assessment, when is it due, and who is subject to the assessment?

The Comptroller of the Currency's (OCC) assessment on national banks and federal savings associations is paid semi-annually.  Assessments are due March 31 and September 30 of each year, based on call and thrift financial report information as of December 31 and June 30 respectively.  An assessment is based on an institution's total assets and other information as reported in the call and thrift financial reports as of December 31 and June 30.  National banks and federal savings associations that depart the national banking system on or before December 31 or June 30 will not be subject to the semi-annual assessment.

What period does the assessment payment cover?

The assessment due March 31 covers the period January 1 through June 30 and the assessment due September 30 covers the period July 1 through December 31.

Will the OCC offer prorations/refunds to banks or federal savings associations that exit the National Banking System?

No.  Institutions must leave the national banking system prior to the close of business on the call/thrift financial report date to avoid paying the full semi-annual assessment.

How is the assessment calculated?

There are three types of assessments that banks and federal savings associations are responsible for: the general assessment that applies to all institutions; the independent trust bank fee; and the independent credit card bank fee.  The independent trust bank fee and independent credit card bank fee apply to only certain institutions.  Trust banks that are not affiliated with a full-service national bank or federal savings association are subject to the independent trust bank fee.  Similarly, credit card banks that are not affiliated with a full-service national bank or federal savings association are subject to the independent credit card bank fee.

A bank’s or federal savings association's assessment may be adjusted if it is considered a problem bank, or if it is a nonlead bank/federal savings association controlled by a company owning two or more national banks/federal savings associations.

  • A problem bank or federal savings association is an institution that is rated a 3, 4, or 5 under the uniform financial institution rating system (UFIRS) or the risk management, operational controls, compliance and asset quality (ROCA) rating system as of the relevant call report date (i.e., December 31 or June 30).  The surcharge is applied to a problem institution's assessment to cover the additional cost of supervising that institution.  A 50 percent surcharge is applied to a 3-rated institution's assessment and a 100 percent surcharge is applied to a 4- or 5-rated institution.  The surcharge is levied on the assessment applicable to the institution's book assets up to $20 billion.
  • A nonlead national bank or federal savings association is entitled to reduce its assessment by 12 percent.  A nonlead bank is a national bank or federal savings association that is not the largest national bank/federal savings association based on total assets, controlled by a company owning two or more national banks/federal savings associations.  All nonlead banks and federal savings associations within that controlling company are entitled to the discount provided the company has at least 25 percent or more of any class of voting securities of the bank and the company controls in any manner the election of a majority of the directors or trustees of the bank.  The 12 percent discount does not apply to the independent trust bank fee or the independent credit card bank fee.

Will the OCC calculate the assessment fee?

Yes.  The OCC computes the assessment amount using the current fee schedule contained in the Notice of Comptroller of the Currency Fees and notifies the institution via e-mail of the amount and the date that the payment will be drafted from their designated account.  This process is based on revisions to the assessment regulations adopted by the OCC (see 73 Federal Register 52576 dated September 10, 2008).

Will the OCC provide an invoice?

No.  The OCC sends e-mail notification of the assessment amount due to each institution’s designated contacts and posts to National BankNet.

When will the OCC notify the institutions of their assessment fee due?

The OCC will provide a minimum of seven business days notice of the amount that will be drafted from an institution's designated account.  The institution is responsible for ensuring that the account is funded properly on the due dates.  The OCC will draft the fee amount on March 31 and September 30.

How does the OCC notify the institutions that it supervises of the current fee structure?

A bank's assessment is calculated based on a fee schedule that is published at least annually.  The Notice of Comptroller of the Currency Fees is made available to the public at least 30 days prior to becoming effective.  The fee schedule is typically published in the Federal Register and made available on the OCC's Web site in December and is effective on January 1.  It addresses all aspects of the OCC's assessment schedule and includes a complete list of the OCC's licensing fees.

Who is responsible for updating institution's account information?

Institutions are responsible for submitting updated account information to the OCC using the Assessment Account Designation Form or by modifying via BankNet.

Is there assessment information available on the OCC's Web site?

Yes. For more detailed information concerning the OCC assessment, visit the following links.

For additional information, please contact:

Bank Assessment Customer Service - 202-649-7946
Deborah Thomas - 202-649-6572